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John Passant

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Me quoted in Fairfax papers on tax haven use
Me quoted by Georgia Wilkins in The Age (and other Fairfax publications) today. John Passant, from the school of political science and international relations, at the Australian National University, said the trend noted by Computershare was further evidence multinationals did not take global regulators seriously. ”US companies are doing this on the hard-nosed basis that any [regulatory] changes that will be made won’t have an impact on their ability to avoid tax,” he said. ”They think it is going to take a long time for the G20 to take action, or that they are just all talk.” (1)

Sprouting sh*t for almost nothing
You can prove my 2 ex-comrades wrong by donating to my blog En Passant at BSB: 062914 Account: 1067 5257, the Commonwealth Bank in Tuggeranong, ACT. More... (12)

My interview Razor Sharp 18 February
Me interviewed by Sharon Firebrace on Razor Sharp on Tuesday 18 February. (0)

My interview Razor Sharp 11 February 2014
Me interviewed by Sharon Firebrace on Razor Sharp this morning. The Royal Commission, car industry and age of entitlement get a lot of the coverage. (0)

Razor Sharp 4 February 2014
Me on 4 February 2014 on Razor Sharp with Sharon Firebrace. (0)

Time for a House Un-Australian Activities Committee?
Tony Abbott thinks the Australian Broadcasting Corporation is Un-Australian. I am looking forward to his government setting up the House Un-Australian Activities Committee. (1)

Make Gina Rinehart work for her dole

Sick kids and paying upfront


Save Medicare

Demonstrate in defence of Medicare at Sydney Town Hall 1 pm Saturday 4 January (0)

Me on Razor Sharp this morning
Me interviewed by Sharon Firebrace this morning for Razor Sharp. It happens every Tuesday. (0)



Archive for 'Capitalism'

Only a re-packaged $100 million for addressing domestic violence Prime Minister- seriously?

Malcom Turnbull going around saying it is un-Australian to hit a woman won’t stop it and his comments look to me as if they are cover for not doing anything substantial to address the results that flow from a sick society where women are treated as chattels or brood mares for capital.


The problem is capitalism, not just who manages it

While I think it is fantastic that the likes of Jeremy Corbyn are raising a whole range of issues from taxing the rich to re-nationalising public goods, from cutting billion from defence spending to supporting refugees and recognising Palestine, and by doing that giving hope to the millions disenfranchised by the tweedledee and tweedledum of neoliberal politics, we need to be clear that the real problem is capitalism, not just who manages it and how they do so. In the long term the only way we can win a better society is by us, the vast majority, uniting to overthrow capitalism and organising production democratically to satisfy human need.

Which is worse Mr Abbott – wind farms or fracking?

Abbott puts short term profit before the health of Australians and before the long term health of the environment and by extension, although he is too blinded by Profit Now! to understand this, the long term survival of his beloved but destructive capitalism.

Is capitalism the problem?

Here is the introduction to my article in Independent Australia on the media, investment and the looming problems facing Australian capitalism

Investment as a consequence of falling returns is drying up. If that trend continues then the Australian economy is headed for a major fall. John Passant questions whether capitalism is the problem along with mainstream media misunderstanding the crisis in Australian politics.

Click here to read the whole article Is capitalism the problem as investment returns dry up?

Hillary Clinton is the candidate of Corporate America and business as usual in Washington

Hillary Clinton is mouthing populist rhetoric, but why should anyone believe her? asks Socialist Worker US. She is the candidate of Corporate America and business as usual in Washington.

Can capitalism save us from climate change?

Can capitalism address climate change?

As James Plested argues in Red Flag:

The world’s richest 85 people alone account for $2.1 trillion – equivalent to the combined wealth of the poorest half of the population. The top 1 percent is worth a whopping $134 trillion. It would only take a small fraction of this amount to drive the kind of large-scale rapid shift towards sustainability that we need. The technology and resources to do so are available. The money is there.

So why doesn’t anything happen? To read the whole article hit this link.

This Changes Everything: Workers have the power to stop climate change

Writing in Socialist Worker UK, Martin Empson reviews Naomi Klein’s new book, This Changes Everything, and argues that the only way to stop climate change is to get rid of capitalism There’s no denying it—capitalism is damaging the planet. The latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report proves that humans are fundamentally changing the […]

An Introduction to the Asian Development Model for Accountants, Lawyers and Other Ne’er Do Wells

The aim of this paper is to give readers examining emerging economies from an accounting, marketing, finance, legal or similar background an introduction to the Asian Development Model.

Capitalism’s first world war and the struggle against it

John Riddell is the author and editor of numerous books, including, most recently, Toward the United Front: Proceedings of the Fourth Congress of the Communist International, 1922. Here, in an article republished from Socialist Worker US, he explains how the First World War broke out 100 years ago, how the socialist movement reacted, and how a revolutionary antiwar opposition emerged.

Europe: between the devastation of capitalism and the possibility of socialism

European parliamentary election results highlighted both the long term disaffection with capitalism’s official political institutions and the impact of the more immediate social crises across the continent, writes Ben Hillier in Red Flag.