John Passant

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Me quoted in Fairfax papers on tax haven use
Me quoted by Georgia Wilkins in The Age (and other Fairfax publications) today. John Passant, from the school of political science and international relations, at the Australian National University, said the trend noted by Computershare was further evidence multinationals did not take global regulators seriously. ”US companies are doing this on the hard-nosed basis that any [regulatory] changes that will be made won’t have an impact on their ability to avoid tax,” he said. ”They think it is going to take a long time for the G20 to take action, or that they are just all talk.” (1)

Sprouting sh*t for almost nothing
You can prove my 2 ex-comrades wrong by donating to my blog En Passant at BSB: 062914 Account: 1067 5257, the Commonwealth Bank in Tuggeranong, ACT. More... (12)

My interview Razor Sharp 18 February
Me interviewed by Sharon Firebrace on Razor Sharp on Tuesday 18 February. http://sharonfirebrace.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/18-2-14-john-passant-aust-national-university-g20-meeting-age-of-enttilement-engineers-attack-of-austerity-hardship-on-civilians.mp3 (0)

My interview Razor Sharp 11 February 2014
Me interviewed by Sharon Firebrace on Razor Sharp this morning. The Royal Commission, car industry and age of entitlement get a lot of the coverage. http://sharonfirebrace.com/2014/02/11/john-passant-aust-national-university-canberra-2/ (0)

Razor Sharp 4 February 2014
Me on 4 February 2014 on Razor Sharp with Sharon Firebrace. http://sharonfirebrace.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/4-2-14-john-passant-aust-national-university-canberra-end-of-the-age-of-entitlement-for-the-needy-but-pandering-to-the-lusts-of-the-greedy.mp3 (0)

Time for a House Un-Australian Activities Committee?
Tony Abbott thinks the Australian Broadcasting Corporation is Un-Australian. I am looking forward to his government setting up the House Un-Australian Activities Committee. (1)

Make Gina Rinehart work for her dole
(0)

Real debate?
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System change, not climate change
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Sick kids and paying upfront

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Archive for 'Tax the rich'

Tax the one per cent at 100 per cent

These ball park figures would indicate that a tax of 100% on any earnings of the one per cent above $250,000 would potentially bring in $36,000,000,000 annually. That is $36 billion a year in tax revenue. This is a handy amount for public health, education, transport, pensions, the disabled and to address climate change.

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Stop the cuts: tax the rich – one socialist’s view

The question is who to tax and I will argue that the rich and capital are capable of paying much more in taxes to fund a fair and equitable society in Australia but that a better way of redistributing income is for workers to win higher real wages. To hear my discussion of stopping the cuts and taxing the rich come along to the Solidarity Forum at 12.30 pm on Thursday 23 April in room 19.2040 at the University of Wollongong.

The Australian Treasurer rang me today about tax reform

‘Nothing is off the agenda and your exciting ideas about taxing the rich should be part of the national conversation,’ Australian Treasurer Joe Hockey told me.

Of shit sandwiches, tax ‘reform’ and taxing the rich

Given the widespread opposition to the 2014 Budget, the one percent have drawn an important lesson from that debacle – consult with the intended victims before launching attacks on poor people and workers. That is what the tax discussion paper is about. This Damascene conversion to talking to people begs the question – is a tax shit sandwich no longer a shit sandwich if it has consultation sprinkles on top? To ask the question is to answer it. The solution to the tax and budgetary dilemmas seems pretty clear. Tax the rich.

Neoliberalism and the destruction of the Australian Tax Office

The outcome of neoliberal policy since 1983, when Hawke Labor began implementing it and laid out the red carpet for Howard and then Abbott, has been a massive shift in wealth in Australia from labour to capital. The process of neoliberal regulatory capture in tax policy and tax law has now, if Second Commissioner Mills’ speech is any indication, also successfully infected the administration of the Australian Tax Office. All the sweet words in the world will not disguise the fact that the fox is now in charge of the revenue hen house.

Me in Green Left Weekly on tackling tax avoidance at the G20

I have an article on tax avoidance and the G20 in Green Left Weekly. Here is how I finish it up: The best way to address the shift in wealth from labour to capital is not through the tax system but through fighting for big real wage increases. Our task should be to help build […]

How about increasing taxes on the rich?

I agree with Finance Minister Matthias Cormann. Taxing the rich and well off could easily address the Budget ’emergency’ and have enough left over to adequately fund better public health, public education and public transport as well as a move to a fully renewable energy society over the next decade.

Australian Tax Office to lose 3000 staff by October; what happens to revenue collections from the rich and powerful, Commissioner?

The one percent has captured not only Parliament and tax policy but tax administration now too. If that is true, the conclusion we might then reach is that the slaughter of Tax Office jobs currently under way is actually an attempt to administratively reduce taxes on capital by weakening the capacity of the ATO to tax the rich and powerful. Certainly that fits in neatly with the neoliberal cut taxes mantra of most politicians and the Treasury.

Over to you Commissioner of Taxation.

Let’s have a great big new tax – on the rich

Let’s be clear here. Australia’s budget deficit is around ten percent of GDP, a very modest amount compared to other developed countries, and half of it a consequence of Abbott government decisions. Australia is a low tax and a low spending country. If we moved to the average tax rate of OECD countries we’d raise about an extra $100 billion a year. It is time not just to chant tax the rich but to mobilise around it as part of a wider push for socially progressive policies on jobs, the environment, indigenous Australians, asylum seekers, gays and lesbians, public health, public education, public transport, disability, pensions, child care and the like.

Why not tax the rich?

Why aren’t taxes on the rich on the agenda, instead of attacking pensioners, sacking tens of thousands of public servants, cutting public transport, health and education spending and slashing funding to the mildly critical ABC and the world ranking CSIRO? I’ll tell you why.

Because the priorities of this government, like all the governments before it, is profit, not people. The Abbott government, like Labor before it, is involved in an attempt to shift massive amounts of wealth to the rich from labour and the poor.